Amir Zakaria Consulting Group | Advertising & Direct Marketing
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Advertising & Direct Marketing

Advertising & Direct Marketing

Advertising is a nonpersonal communication that is paid for and identified by a specific sponsor. Advertising by definition requires a message to communicate and some type of media platform to deliver the message. Marketing messaging is required for all promotional elements, which is why the process of creating advertising is an essential first step in IMC. Effectively, advertising is the ‘C’ in IMC. Good advertising begins with a clear identification of the target audience. Both upstream and downstream social marketing aim to change behavior (Hastings, MacFadyen, & Anderson, 2000). The key differences are in target audience and the approach used to reach the target audience. Up-stream social marketing targets policy makers (e.g., legislators, regulators), educators, and the media. The approach developed also identifies periphery targets that hold potential influence on the primary upstream target. In this way, multiple targeted advertising appeals may be useful for upstream social marketing. Popularity appeals can be effective with policy makers, in addition to the conducting of polling or the use of existing polling to show that a large portion of a policy maker’s constituents favors a particular regulation (Martin Key et al, 2017).

While advertising is comprised of nonpersonal communications, direct marketing seeks to create a one-to-one personal relationship with the target audience. Again, the goal is to generate a response. The engine behind direct marketing is a sophisticated database. The era of big data allows social marketers to know more than ever before about a target audience, which can make social marketing messaging more effective. Direct marketing can also play a role in an influence-the-influencer strategy (Hein, 2007). A database of constituents friendly to a social marketing cause can be leveraged by asking them to personally contact an upstream target audience in order to reinforce existing efforts (Martin Key et al, 2017).

Reference

  • Hastings, G., Stead, M., & Webb, J. (2004). Fear appeals in social marketing: Strategic and ethical reasons for concern. Psychology and Marketing, 21(11), 961—986.
  • Martin Key, T., Czaplewski, A.J. (2017). “Upstream social marketing strategy: An integrated marketing communications approach”. Business Horizons, No. 1365.
  • Hein, K. (2007). Report explores what influences the influencers. Brandweek, 48(6), 13.
  • Martin Key, T., Czaplewski, A.J. (2017). “Upstream social marketing strategy: An integrated marketing communications approach”. Business Horizons, No. 1365.

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