Amir Zakaria Marketing Branding Agency | Change impact analysis
Determining the impact of changes on other development artifacts is called change impact analysis. One of the critical issues that an organization faces is change impact analysis: estimating the potential effects of changing a business process to other processes in the organization's business process repository. Change impact analysis usually starts with the business analyst examining the change request and determining the processes initially affected by the change (i.e. the primary changes).
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Change impact analysis

Change impact analysis

Determining the impact of changes on other development artifacts is called change impact analysis.

One of the critical issues that an organization faces is change impact analysis: estimating the potential effects of changing a business process to other processes in the organization’s business process repository.

Change impact analysis usually starts with the business analyst examining the change request and determining the processes initially affected by the change (i.e. the primary changes).

Change impact analysis plays a major part in planning and establishing the feasibility of a change in terms of predicting the cost and complexity of the change (before implementing it). This helps reduce the risks associated with making changes that have unintended, expensive, or even disastrous effects on existing business operations (Khanh Dam et al, 2015).

Change impact analysis provides a sound basis to decide whether a change is adequate, and to identify which decisions should be changed as a consequence (Passos et al., 2013).

A change impact analysis approach that informs the analysts about the causes of change impacts on configuration decisions in order to improve the decision-making process and to incrementally reconfigure the generated PS use case models for the impacted decisions only;

An industrial case study demonstrating the applicability and benefits of our change impact analysis approach (Hajri et al, 2018).

Traditional approaches to change impact analysis in business processes tend to focus on establishing inter-process relationships (i.e. dependencies) and using this knowledge for impact analysis. These approaches rely on a classification of relationships between business processes (Kurniawan et al, 2012; 2013; Khanh Dam et al, 2015).

Reference

  • Hajri, I.; Goknil, A.; Briand, L. C.; Stephany, TH. (2018). “Change impact analysis for evolving configuration decisions in product line use case models”. Journal of Systems and Software, Volume 139, Pages 211-237.
  • Passos, L.; Czarnecki, K.; Apel, S.; Wasowski, A.; Kästner, C.; Guo, J. (2013). “Feature-oriented software evolution”. VaMoS’13.
  • Goknil, A.; Kurtev, I.; van den Berg, K.; Spijkerman, W. (2014). “Change impact analysis for requirements: A meta modeling approach”. Information and Software Technology, Volume 56, Issue 8, Pages 950-972.
  • Kurniawan, T.A.; Ghose, A.K.; Dam, H.K.; Leˆ, L.-S. (2012). “Relationship-preserving change propagation in process ecosystems, in: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Service-Oriented Computing”. ICSOC’12, pp. 63–78.
  • Kurniawan, T.A.; Ghose, A.K.; Dam, H.K.; Leˆ, L.-S. (2013). “On formalizing inter-process relationships, in: F. Daniel, K. Barkaoui, S. Dustdar (Eds.), Business Process Management Workshops (co-located with the 9th International Conference on Business Process Management), vol. 100 of Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing, Springer, 2011, pp. 75–86.
  • Khanh Dam, H.; Ghose, A. (2015). “Mining version histories for change impact analysis in business process model repositories”. Computers in Industry, Volume 67, Pages 72-85.

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