Amir Zakaria Marketing Branding Agency | Remanufacturing
The importance of remanufacturing has been increasing since stricter regulations on protecting the environment were enforced. Remanufacturing is considered as the main means of retaining value from used products and components in order to drive a circular economy. However, it is more complex than traditional manufacturing due to the uncertainties associated with the quality, quantities and return timing of used products and components. Over the past few years, various methods of optimising remanufacturing outcomes have been developed to make decisions such as identifying the best End-Of-Life (EOL) options, acquiring the right amounts of cores, deciding the most suitable disassembly level, applying suitable cleaning techniques, and considering product commonality across different product families. A decision being made at one remanufacturing activity will greatly affect the decisions at subsequent activities, which will affect remanufacturing outcomes, i.e. productivity, economic performance effectiveness, and the proportion of core that can be salvaged. Therefore, a holistic way of integrating different decisions over multiple remanufacturing activities is needed to improve remanufacturing outcomes, which is a major knowledge gap (Sitcharangsie et al., 2019).
Remanufacturing, economy, circular economy, amir zakaria, amirzakaria, nazli monajemzadeh, اميرذكريا, امير ذكريا, اميرابوالفضل ذكريايي, نازلي منجم زاده
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Remanufacturing

Remanufacturing

The importance of remanufacturing has been increasing since stricter regulations on protecting the environment were enforced. Remanufacturing is considered as the main means of retaining value from used products and components in order to drive a circular economy. However, it is more complex than traditional manufacturing due to the uncertainties associated with the quality, quantities and return timing of used products and components. Over the past few years, various methods of optimising remanufacturing outcomes have been developed to make decisions such as identifying the best End-Of-Life (EOL) options, acquiring the right amounts of cores, deciding the most suitable disassembly level, applying suitable cleaning techniques, and considering product commonality across different product families. A decision being made at one remanufacturing activity will greatly affect the decisions at subsequent activities, which will affect remanufacturing outcomes, i.e. productivity, economic performance effectiveness, and the proportion of core that can be salvaged. Therefore, a holistic way of integrating different decisions over multiple remanufacturing activities is needed to improve remanufacturing outcomes, which is a major knowledge gap (Sitcharangsie et al., 2019).

Remanufacturing is widely recognized among the most profitable and resource efficient options for implementing the circular economy paradigm at industrial level, since it targets the recovery and reuse of functions and materials from post use –products (Colledani et al., 2017). It is defined as the set of operations for returning a used product to, at least, its original performance with a warranty that is equivalent or better than that of the newly manufactured product. The benefits of remanufacturing are particularly relevant in the scenario where the manufacturer exploits its product knowledge to offer are manufactured product to the aftermarket, at more affordable economic conditions.

The proposed multi-method model for remanufacturing is based on the integration of system dynamics, modelling the strategic and operational aspects of the remanufacturing business scenario, and agent-based simulation, modelling the customer behaviour towards newly manufactured and remanufactured products (Nassehi et al., 2018).

Reference

  • Apra-Automotive Part Remanufacturers Association. (2012). “Remanufacturing Terminology, Remanufacturing Term Guideline.
  • Colledani, M.; Tolio, T.; Duflou, J.; Seliger, G.; Bernard, A.; Kara, S.; Battaia, O.; Takata, S. (2017). “Management and Control of Demanufacturing and Remanufacturing Systems”. CIRP Annals: Manufacturing Technology, 66 (2): 585–609.
  • Nassehi, A.; Colledani, M. (2018). “A multi-method simulation approach for evaluating the effect of the interaction of customer behaviour and enterprise strategy on economic viability of remanufacturing”. CIRP Annals-Manufacturing Technology 67, 33– 36.
  • Sitcharangsie, S.; jomah, W.; Wong, T. C. (2019). “Decision makings in key remanufacturing activities to optimise remanufacturing outcomes: A review”. Journal of Cleaner Production, Volume 232, Pages 1465-1481.

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