Amir Zakaria Consulting Group | Organizational cognition
Organizational cognition Organizational cognition is a system and process aims at the improvement of organizational learning and development. It subsumes attention, leadership, culture, structure, empowerment, knowledge workers and decision-making and problem-solving processes. amir zakaria, nazli monajemzadeh, اميرذكريا, امير ذكريا, نازلی منجم‌زاده
Organizational cognition, process, amir zakaria, nazli monajemzadeh, اميرذكريا, امير ذكريا, نازلی منجم‌زاده
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Organizational cognition

Organizational cognition

Organizational cognition is a system and process aims at the improvement of organizational learning and development. It subsumes attention, leadership, culture, structure, empowerment, knowledge workers and decision-making and problem-solving processes.

Organizational cognitive theory sate that as opposed to human cognition, which is natural, organizational cognition is artificial made of technology, social networks and culture, structure and design, its elements and workers. Organizational cognition is a discipline which has its foundations based on multidisciplinary research areas that span from social sciences, economics, business administration, management, sociology, political science, anthropology, philosophy, psychology, information systems, cognitive sciences and computer sciences. Although, the researchers have not yet developed a consoladated definition of the organizational cognition but the research findings and theories of the organizational cognition state that, organizational cognition is a complete system, having concern with collective learning in the organization, focus on the detection and correction of organizational threats and problems (Alhabeeb and Rowley, 2017; Atwood et al., 2010; Belle, 2016). It is a discipline which contributes to improve the computational capacity of the organization along with its ability for knowledge and uncertainty management.

The discipline of organizational behavior, which includes subjects such as organizational structure, culture, human resources management, power, politics and negotiation, leadership, motivation, and communication, offers the building blocks for informatics-related processes such as systems implementation, change management, strategic planning, and project management (Ash and Lorenzi, 2017).

Organizational cognition is a process or a set of processes that subsume attention, knowledge organization, decision-making and problem-solving. These processes are supported by organizational goals, environmental demands, threats and opportunities (Moon et al., 2017; Gino and Staats, 2015). It has been found that the most influencing cognitive factors of cognitive prospective are knowledge workers, leadership style and role, employees empowerment, organizational culture, organizational structure, organizational strategy, performance measurement system, training and development (Alalwan et al., 2016; Adcock, 2012; Coetzer et al., 2017). Therefore, the researchers have recommended that the role and impact of the theses cognitive factors should explored for the organizational learning development in various sectors (Turi et al., 2019).

Reference

  • Adcock, A. (2012). “Cognitive dissonance in the learning processes”. Encycl. Sci. Learning, pp. 588-590
  • Alalwan, A.A., Dwivedi, Y.K., Rana, N.P., Williams, M.D. (2016). “Consumer adoption of mobile banking in Jordan: examining the role of usefulness, ease of use, perceived risk and self-efficacy”. J. Enterp. Inf. Manag., 29 (1), pp. 118-139
  • Alhabeeb, A., Rowley, J. (2017). “Critical success factors for eLearning in Saudi Arabian universities”. Int. J. Educ. Manag., 31 (2), pp. 131-147
  • Ash, J. S., Lorenzi, N. M. (2017). “Organizational and Behavioral Issues”. Transforming Health Care Through Health Information Technology, Pages 115-130.
  • Atwood, M.A., Mora, J.W., Kaplan, A.W. (2010). “Learning to lead: evaluating leadership and organizational learning”. Leadersh. Organ. Dev. J., 31 (7), pp. 576-595
  • Belle, S. (2016). “Organizational Learning? Look Again”. The Learning Organization, pp. 332-341.
  • Coetzer, A., Kock, H., Wallo, A. (2017). “Distinctive characteristics of small businesses as sites for informal learning”. Hum. Resour. Dev. pp. 18-32
  • Gino, F., Staats, B. (2015). “Why organizations don’t learn”. Harv. Bus. Rev.
  • Moon, H., Ruona, W., Valentine, T. (2017). “Organizational strategic learning capability: exploring the dimensions”. Eur. J. Train. Dev., 41 (3), pp. 222-240.
  • Turi, J. A., Sorooshian, SH., Javed. Y. (2019). “Impact of the cognitive learning factors on sustainable organizational development”. Heliyon, Volume 5, Issue 9, e02398.

 

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